Cv Publications 2012 -17

2012

 

January Work Bank

March David Medalla

David Hockney

Lucian Freud

April  Wiltshire

May   Damien Hirst

June  Being Tracey

July   Cumbria: A County Guide

August London Festival

October Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

November   The Ring of Minos

December   Two Bridges

2013

January    Francesco Clemente

February  Edward Lucie-Smith

The Decline & Fall of the Avant-Garde

March  Kurt Schwitters

April Robert Rauschenberg

Chuck Close

July ,Photography and Art

John Dugger

October The Dance of Death

November  London Terminal

December Art, Criticism & Display

2014

January Tracks 2014

July 

Art, Poetry and WW1

September

Les Berbères et Moi

Octoberber  

Liverpool Biennal

Visiting Frieze Art Fair 2014

November 

Between Dream and Nightmare

December 

Rembrandt and Turner

2015

February 

The Private John Singer Sargent

March

Leon Golub  Political Painting

Goya Between Two Worlds

May 

David Hockney  Painting & Photography 

Annely Juda

October

Ai Weiwei

November 

Through the Lens

Giacometti –Auerbach

December 

Artist & Empire

 Michael Craig-Martin 

Julia Margaret Cameron

2016

January    February 

March 

Albion Journal  Audio

April   May

Photo-London 2016

Yayoi Kusama at Victoria Miro

Jaff Koons: NOW

Newport Street Gallery

Painting with Light

Tate Britain

June 

Bridget Riley

The Curve Paintings 1961-2014

Gemente Museum The Hague

Painters’ Paintings

National Gallery

July 

Georgia O’Keeffe

Tate Modern

David Hockney

Royal Academy - Annely Juda

September

Picasso / Pollock

NPG / RA

2017

January 

Michael Andrews

Gagosian Grovesnor Hill

March

John Latham: A World View

Serpentine Gallery

Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends

National Portrait Gallery

Ashley Bickerton

Newport Street Gallery

April

Painted Lives

David Hockney . Vanessa Bell

Anish Kapoor

Lisson Gallery

 

 

 


 

 

Art . Travel . Histories . Social Studies . Studio work

 

Cv  April

 

It’s a great archive..a good book for dipping nto” Susie Honeyman

 

 

 

 

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Cv Publications

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1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 10 . 11 . 12 .13 . 14 . 15 . 16 . 17 . 18 . 19 . 20 . 21 . 22 . 23 . 24 . 25 . 26 . 27 . 28 . 29

Cv/VAR Archive

Projects 1974-96

Francisco Goya, (1746-1828) Valentias? Quenta con los anos (Showing off? Remember your age) 'Black Border' Album (E), page 7 c. 1816-20Brush and black ink with wash and scraping 266 x 186 mm Berlin, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Preussischer, Kulturbesitz, Kupferstichkabinett, kdz 439

 

 

GOYA BETWEEN TWO WORLDS

 

Old people and flying figures, are staple elements in this sequence of drawings. Flying or falling is sometimes presented as a metaphor for dreaming, as in the drawing with a single protagonist, probably male, which is entitled Pesadilla (‘Nightmare’). This is one of the things that reinforces the idea that the drawings in this series can legitimately be regarded as proto-surrealist, fore-shadowings of thing that the 20th century Surrealist Movement was to bring to fruition. Another over-riding characteristic of the drawings is, quite simply, that they were private – made by a man using this means to hold a conversation with himself. In this, they differ from the prints of the Disparates series. Though these, in the end, were never published during Goya’s lifetime, the very fact that they are prints, not drawing – manufactured, multiple objects – argues that the artist must have envisaged a possible public for them.

 

It also argues that other people, not just Goya himself, knew that a print series was being worked on. With the drawings, this was not necessarily the case.  If we think of the drawings as an intimate conversation – the self interrogating the self – there is perhaps one thing that we do well to remember is that Goya was profoundly deaf, as the result of an illness suffered in 1792-3. The house he occupied at the time when these drawings were made was called the Quinta del Sordo - the ‘House of the Deaf Man’ – so his deafness must by that time have been regarded as one of his defining characteristics.

 

It was decorated with phantasmagoric paintings, the so-called Black Paintings, which certainly have some relationship to the drawings exhibited at the Courtauld. Executed in oil directly on the walls of the house, these paintings have been described by the Goya scholar Fred Licht as “the most essential to our understanding of the human condition in modern times, just as Michelangelo’s ceiling is essential to understanding the tenor of the 16th century.”  This description is much too hyperbolic. Michelangelo’s frescos in the Sistine were always intended for public scrutiny, if not, perhaps for the throngs of tourists who now come to the Vatican to see them.

 

The Black Paintings are now visible in the Prado, in much damaged and overpainted condition, but they did not migrate there until as late as 187, when they were taken down from their original position and rather brutally transferred to canvas. Before that they lurked in the private residence of someone who was become increasingly reclusive, not only because of his alienation from the restored Bourbon regime, but because of his disability.The paintings, as much as the drawings, belong to the private universe of a man deprived of one of his primary senses, more interested in his own meditations than in actually communicating to an audience, however small.  One of the things that tends to distinguish these drawings from ‘normal’ caricatures is that they are often ambiguous. There is no clear message. This ambiguity is so deep rooted in some of the images that one gets the feeling that they may sometimes have puzzled the artist himself.

 

There is another drawing entitled Pessadilla or Nightmare, from very late in the sequence that scholars have now reconstructed. It shows an old hag carrying two skeletal male figures on her back. Originally it was called Vision, a title still legible but now crossed out. The exhibition catalogue claims that this change “demonstrates the importance [Goya] accorded to verbal as well as visual expression.” I beg to differ. I think it illustrates the fact that the artist sometimes felt deeply uncertain about the significance of what his subconscious offered up to him. ! The things the drawings openly say – their noncoded, non-hermetic messages – are disconcerting enough. While the exhibition curators would clearly like to put the emphasis on witches and witchcraft, seeing this link to the supernatural and uncanny as something that joins Goya, in his later years, to the Europe-wide Romantic Movement, what strikes me is their fascination, one might almost say their obsession, with the idea of old age. My approach to them comes from the fact that I am now even older than Goya was when he created these images. To a spectator of my years, he says; “Hey, look at this, bro – we’re both in the same boat.”

 

Extract from Goya Between Two Worlds

ISBN 978910110270  £14.99

Published in 2015by Cv Publications

Text copyright Edward Lucie-Smith 2015

All rights reserved.

 

 

PAINTED LIVES  . PICASSO/POLLOCK . GIACOMETTI-AUERBACH . ANISH KAPOOR . ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG . ARMAN . THÉRÈSE OULTON . TRACEY EMIN . JONATHAN YEO . MASACCIO . FRANCESCO CLEMENTE . . Cv CATALOGUE

 

 

TATE ALBUMS

FOLIO ‘80s

THE GALLERY

22:24

AS IS THEN

ROBOROUGH ESTATE

TWO BRIDGES

LANDSCAPE SERIES

ANATOMY OF THE BODY

THE LISTENER

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOWARD HODGKIN:

b.6 August 1932-d.9 March 2017

 

ABSENT FRIENDS 23 Mar -18 Jun 201

National Portrait Gallery

 

 

The Spectator by Howard Hodgkin, 1984-87,

 

Michael P. Green © Estate of Howard Hodgkin;

Courtesy NPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RAPHAEL: THE DRAWINGS
Ashmolan Museum Oxford 

1 June – 3 September 2017

 

120 works by Raphael from international collections will go on show at the Ashmolean this summer in the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition

 

The heads and hands of two apostles, c. 1519–20
Black chalk with over pounced underdrawing with some white heightening, 49.9 x 36.4 cm

 © Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PIET MONDRIAN

At the Gementemuseum The Hague

 

The entire holding of works by Piet Mondrian will go on show at the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague in a ground-breaking exhibition The Discovery of Mondrian – Amsterdam | Paris | London | New York, from 3 June – 24 September 2017.

 

 

Piet Mondrian, Victory Boogie Woogie (1942-1944),

Gemeentemuseum Den Haag